Research Article

Effect of Next Generation Fertilizers on Yield Potential of Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

M. A. A. Faroque, Alok Kumar Paul, Asaduzzaman, Parimal Bissus and M. S. Islam

  • Page No:  007 - 015
  • Published online: 19 Feb 2021
  • DOI : HTTPS://DOI.ORG/10.23910/1.2021.2151e

  • Abstract
  •  faroquekbd@gmail.com

The experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of next-generation fertilizers along with other recommended fertilizers on the growth and yield during the period from January 2015 to May 2015 at the experimental field of Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The experiments were laid out in RCBD method with three replications. The experiment was conducted in boro rice with six treatments including control viz Treatment= Control (no fertilizer), Treatment= Recommended dose N140P20K60S18Zn2 kg ha-1, Treatment= Bio-forge + N140P20K60S18Zn2, Treatment = Wuxal Super+N140P20K60S18Zn2, Treatment4= Root feed + N140P20K60S18Zn2, Treatment5=Nitro Plus+N140P20K60S18Zn2 and three rice varieties namely Variety= BRRI dhan29, Variety= BRRI dhan28 and Variety3=BRRI dhan58. Next-genaration fertilizer is a mixed fertilizer with the first generation and second generation fertilizer that provide required nutritions to plants. Among the next generation fertilizers, Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers performed the best compared to other treatments of the study in an aspect of growth and yield contributing characters mainly plant height, effective tiller hill-1, panicle length, filled grain panicle-1, 1000-grain weight, harvest index and grain yield (8.61 t ha-1). Among the varieties, BRRI dhan29 showed the best performance compared to the other two treatments. The next generation fertilizer viz. Bio-forge and Root feed along with other recommended fertilizers would be ideal for better crop growth and yield.

Keywords :   Rice, next-generation, fertilizer, growth, and yield

  • Introduction

    Bangladesh is an agriculture-based country. Agriculture is the main stem of livelihood for more than 80% of the country’s population (Anonymous, 2016). The main purpose of agriculture is to provide food for the increasing population. Fertilizer is considered one of the main inputs for increasing crop yields and farmer’s profit. It is true for Bangladesh agriculture because it has virtually no possibility of increasing its cultivable land area. Besides, rice is the dominant staple food for many countries of the world. It is also the most important food crop and a major food grain for more than a third of the world population and 42% calories of the global population (Anonymous, 2009a). It covers about 77% of agricultural land and engages about 70% of the population in rice production activities. Nearly 50% of our employments are generated in the rice sector (Chowdury and Mian, 2013. However, the national average rice yield in Bangladesh (4.6 t ha-1) is very low compared to other rice-growing countries, like China (6.70 t ha-1), Japan (6.90 t ha-1), and Korea (7.20 t ha-1) (Anonymous, 2015).

    In the early 1950s, farmers applied organic manures (first generation) such as cow dung, bone meal to aus and aman rice and farmyard manure (FYM), mustard oil cake, and fish meal to mustard and vegetable crops (Anonymous, 1958). The use of inorganic fertilizer (second generation) started in the country in 1951 with the import of 2,698 tons of ammonium sulphate, phosphates in 1957, and muriate of potash in 1960 (Ahmed, 1987). Bangladesh experienced a magnificent increase in food production through the effect of the green revolution. Thus, fertilizer consumption began to increase rapidly with the introduction of HYV rice (Quasem, 1978).

    Food security has become a major and fast-growing concern worldwide. It is proposed that there is a need to double the world food production to feed the ever-increasing population which is set to reach the nine billion mark by 2050 (Anonymous, 2009b). The farmers of Bangladesh could not harvest additional yield from crops due to a lack of knowledge in using next-generation fertilizers, although the role of growth controlling in various physiological and biochemical processes is well known. But still, some hidden hunger is remaining in plants, even though some farmers are following recommended fertilizer done under IPNS basis. As a result, farmers are not getting the desired yield of the crops. So, Next-generation fertilizer is nutritional diversed fertilizers to provide total nutritional requirements for plants without compromising on productivity while protecting ecology and also address “First Generation” & “Second Generation” fertilizer.

    Bangladesh needs to continue its efforts to search for effective and usable means of improving NPKS use efficiency and alternative sources of fertilizer for reducing the yield gap. It has no alternative to maximize crop yields per unit area through the intensive use of land and soil resources. With this view, the research will be taken out on next-generation fertilizer products for soil fertility and increasing crop production. So many researches had taken initiative on fertilizer management like effect, doses, and timing, etc. but no enough research on next-generation fertilizer materials are still found.

    Above aspect, the present study was conducted to investigate the effects of next-generation fertilizers in combination with NPK on the growth, yield potential of rice.


  • Materials and Methods

    2.1.  Study sites

    The experiment was conducted for rice from January 2015 to May 2015. The experimental area was situated at 23°77°N latitude and 90°33°E longitude at an altitude of 8.6 meters above the sea level The experimental field belongs to the Agro-ecological zone of “The Modhupur Tract”, AEZ-28 (Anonymous, 1988). The experimental area was flat having available irrigation and drainage system and above flood level. The area has a subtropical climate, characterized by high temperature, high relative humidity, and heavy rainfall with occasional gusty winds in January- May. Soil samples from 0-15 cm depths were collected from the experimental field. Physical and chemical properties of the initial soil sample were found Sand 30.0%, Silt 40.4%, Clay 29.6%, Textural class-Clay Loam, pH-6.8, Bulk density 1.47 g cc-1, Particle density 2.50 g cc-1, Organic carbon 0.68%, Organic matter 1.18%, Total N 0.06%, Available P 20.32 ppm, Exchangeable K 0.15 meq 100 g-1 soil and Available S 12.40 ppm.

    2.2.  Method of data collection

    Three varieties of rice were used in this experiment for growth measurement under four next-generation fertilizers with control following a two-factor experiment in RCBD design with 03 (three) replications. Factor A: NGF+recommended fertilizers with control (8) Factor B: Rice Varieties (3).

    On 03 January 2015, 45 days old seedlings were transplanted in the experiment field keeping plant to plant distance 15 cm and row to row distance 25 cm. Gap filling was made up to 7 days after transplanting to maintain proper treatment and similar plant population density for each plot. The full triple superphosphate (TSP), muriate of potash (MoP), gypsum, and zinc fertilizers were applied in the experimental plots @ P20, K60, S18, Zn2 kg ha-1 respectively as basal dose in the experimental plots except for control plots. The recommended dose of N was 140 kg ha-1. N was applied as per treatment in three equal splits. The first split was applied after 15 days of transplanting, the second split was applied after 35 days of transplanting i.e. at the active vegetative stage and the third split was applied after 60 days of transplanting i.e. at the panicle initiation stage. The next generation fertilizers e.g. Wuxal super, Bio-forge, Root feed, and Niro-Plus were sprayed at 20, 40, and 60 DAS on plants of the experimental plots @ 5.0 l ha-1, 1.20 l ha-1, 1.20 kg ha-1, and 1.2 l ha-1 respectively.

    The crop was harvested at maturity stage and started on 02 May 2015 for BRRI dhan28 and BRRI dhan58 and BRRI dhan29 was harvested on 14 May 2015. The harvested crop was collected plot-wise. Grain and straw yields were recorded separately plot-wise and moisture percentage was calculated after sun drying. Dry weight for both grain and straw were also recorded.

    Data recorded for yield and yield contributing characters were compiled and tabulated in proper form for statistical analyses. Analysis of variance was done with the help of the MSTAT-C computer package program developed by Russel (1986). The mean differences among the treatments were evaluated with the DMRT test (Gomez and Gomez, 1984).


  • Results and Discussion

    3.1.  Plant height of rice

    Plant height was varied significantly due to the effect of next-generation fertilizers (NGF) along with other recommended fertilizers while plant height ranges from 86.10 to 94.83 cm (LSD0.05=2.602, Table 1).


    The tallest plant of 94.83 cm was found from the treatment T2 receiving Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers which were statistically similar to treatment T4 (92.23 cm). The shortest plant height (86.10 cm) was found in T0 control treatment. These results expressed that the plant height of rice increased in apply of Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers. Various physiological processes including cell division and cell elongation of the plant might be influenced by the application of Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers. These findings are in agreement with the findings of Rogaciano and Rosill (2015) who researched to determine the effects of three liquid fertilizers (Nitrofert, crop gaint, and nutriplant AG) on the growth of glutinous corn. Findings revealed that the height of corn was not significantly affected by the supplementation of different liquid fertilizers. Plant height was significantly influenced by the effect of variety (LSD0.05=3.890, Table 2).


    The highest plant (98.31 cm) was found in the variety V3 (BRRI dhan58). The lowest plant highest was found in the treatment V2 (87.81 cm) which was statistically similar to V1treatment (89.06 cm). The above variation in plant height was observed due to the variation of the genetic character. Similar findings were also obtained by Islam et al. (2013) who found significant and genetic variation among the varieties on plant height. Mahamud et al. (2013), who found that the variation in plant height was indicated by the differentiation of genotypic characters and their genetic makeup also. Besides, the climatic and soil condition of the studied area were favorable for better growth of BRRI dhan58 which ultimately showed the highest plant height among the other two.

    At the harvest stage, plant height varied significantly due to the effect of the interaction of variety and NGF along with other recommended fertilizers where plant height significantly varied from 80.63 cm to 101.70 cm (LSD0.05=8.530, Table 3). The highest plant height (101.70 cm) was found in the treatment combination of T2V3which was statistically similar to T2V1, T2V2,and T4V1 treatment combination. The shortest plant (80.63 cm) was found from the variety BRRI dhan28 while it did not receive any levels of fertilizer (T0V2) which was statistically similar to the treatment combination of T0V3 (84.48 cm).

    3.2.  Number of effective tillers hill-1 of rice

    The numbers of effective tillers are an important parameter that influences the yield of rice. The supply of nutrients plays a great role in the production of effective tillers per hill. The NGF along with other recommended fertilizers had a significant effect on the increased number of effective tillers hill-1 (LSD0.05=3.219, Table 1). The highest number of effective tillers hill-1 (17.33) was found in treatment T2 having Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers which were statistically similar with treatment T4 (Root feed along with other recommended fertilizers (16.78). The lowest number of effective tillers hill-1 (11.33) was produced in T0 control treatment. These results revealed that Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers influenced to produce the more effective tillers due to the rice plant can be utilized more nutrient from the soil. The maximum number of effective tillers hill-1 (16.61) was found in V1 (BRRI dhan29) (LSD0.05=2.276). The lowest number of effective tillers hill-1 was found in treatment V3 which was statistically similar to V2 treatment. Results revealed that BRRI dhan29 produced the maximum number of effective tillers hill1 than BRRI dhan28 and BRRI dhan58 due to variation in their genetic characteristics or genetic makeup and environmental condition. Similarly, significant variation among the rice varieties regarding tillers hill-1 were also found by Panwar et al. (2012) and Alam et al. (2012). The effect of interaction between treatment and varieties was significant to the number of effective tillers hill-1 (LSD0.05=4.575, Table 3).


    The significant variation was found that the number of effective tillers varied from 10.00 to 19.67 where the maximum number of effective tillers hill-l (19.67) was produced from the variety BRRI dhan29 receiving of Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers which were statistically insignificant with T2V2. The minimum number of effective tillers hill-1 (10.00) was produced in the treatment combination of T0V1 (BRRI dhan29 having no fertilizer treatment) which was statistically similar to the treatment combination of T0V2 and T0V3.

    3.3.  Number of non-effective tillers hill-1 of rice

    The NGF along with other recommended fertilizers showed significant variation in the number of non-effective tillers hill-1 of rice (LSD0.05=1.98, Table 1). The maximum number of non-effective tillers hill-1 (6.00) was observed from T0 treatment whereas the minimum number of non-effective tillers hill-1 (3.11) from T2 treatment was statistically similar (3.91 and 3.80) with T3 and T4 treatment. The maximum number of non-effective tillers hill-1 (4.63) was found in V2 (BRRI dhan28) which was statistically similar to V3 treatment (LSD0.05=1.531, Table 2). Result revealed that V1 (BRRI dhan29) produced less number of effective tillers hill-1 than BRRI dhan28 and BRRI dhan58. Significant variation was found in the number of non-effective tillers hill-1 (LSD0.05=5.655,Table 3). The maximum number of non-effective tillers hill-1 (7.53) was produced from the treatment combination of T0V2 which was statistically similar to T0V1 (5.80) and T0V3 (6.81) combination. The minimum number of non-effective tillers hill-1 (3.33) was produced in the treatment combination of T2V1 which was statistically similar to the treatment combination of T4V1 (3.34).

    3.4.  Panicle length of rice

    Panicle length was showed statistical variation among the NGF along with other recommended fertilizers (LSD0.05=0.900, Table 1). The longest panicle (26.09 cm) was obtained from the treatment T2 having Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers which were statistically similar to T4 treatment. The shortest panicle (24.16 cm) was found in the treatment T0. These results revealed that Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers had effective influence than other treatment combinations to produce the longest panicle. So, the above findings were agreed by the research work of Rashid et al. (2011); Hoshain (2010), and other researchers of the home and abroad. Panicle length was significantly influenced by the variety (LSD0.05=0.933, Table 2). It was found that the longest panicle (26.03 cm) was observed in BRRI dhan29 (V1) and the shortest panicle (24.62 cm) was found in the treatment V2 which was statistically similar with V3 treatment.  These results showed that there was a significant difference among the cultivar might be due to its genetic variation. This result is in agreement with the findings Shiyam et al. (2014); Sarker et al. (2014) and many other scientists. A significant variation was found in panicle length of yield character due to the treatment combination (LSD0.05=2.287, Table 3). The longest panicle (26.96 cm) was recorded from the variety BRRI dhan29 containing Root Feed (T4V1) which was statistically similar with T2V1, T2V2, T2V3, T4V2, and T4V3 while the shortest panicle (23.71 cm) was obtained from the variety BRRI dhan28 with the treatment combination of T0V2.

    3.5.  Filled grain panicle-1 of rice

    The number of filled grains panicle-1 was varied due to the effect of treatment of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers. So, the maximum number of filled grains panicle-1 (154.90) was recorded in treatment T2 which was statistically similar to T4 treatment (150.90) (LSD0.05=10.96, Table 1). On the other hand, the minimum number of filled grains panicle-1 (132.1) was produced from the treatment T0 control. Similarly, Rashid et al. (2011) also found a significant variation in the production of grains panicle-1 due to the effect of urea– nitrogen, cow dung, poultry manure, and urban wastes produced the maximum number of filled grains panicle-1. The number of filled grains panicle-1 was significantly influenced by the effect of variety (LSD0.05=12.000,Table 2). The maximum number of filled grains panicle-1 (168.7) in the treatment V1 (BRRI dhan29). The minimum number of filled grain panicle-1 (123.70) as found in the treatment V2 which was statistically similar to V3. Filled grains panicle-1 is the most important yield attribute, the increasing grains panicle-1 significantly increased the grain yield for any crops. Such the similar above findings of the present study were also found by Uddin et al. (2011) who reported the significant differences were found in filled grains panicle-1 while BRRI dhan44 produced the highest and Lalchicon produced the lowest. The number of filled grains panicle-1 was influenced by the effect of a combination of treatment and varieties (LSD0.05=29.380, Table 3). The number of filled grains panicle-1 significantly varied from 103.3 to 193.70. It was found that the maximum number of filled grains panicle-1 was produced from the variety BRRI dhan29 receiving of Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers (T2V1) which were statistically similar to T2V2 and T2V3 treatment combination.

    3.6.  Unfilled grain panicle-1 of rice

    The number of unfilled grains panicle-1 was varied due to the effect of treatment of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers (LSD0.05=1.98,Table 1). The maximum number of unfilled grains panicle-1 (8.60) was recorded in treatment T0. On the other hand, the minimum number of unfilled grains panicle-1 (5.71) was produced from the treatment T2. The number of filled grains panicle-1 was significantly influenced by the effect of variety (LSD0.05=1.53,Table 2). The maximum number of unfilled grains panicle-1 (7.13) in the treatment V2 (BRRI dhan28) was statistically similar to treatment V3. The minimum number of unfilled grain panicle-1 (5.57) is found in the treatment V1 (BRRI Dhan 29). The number of unfilled grains panicle-1 was influenced by the effect of the combination of treatment and varieties (LSD0.05=5.654, Table 3). The number of unfilled grains panicle-1 significantly varied from 6.03 to 10.23. It was found that the maximum number of unfilled grains panicle-1 (10.23) was produced from the variety BRRI dhan28 with control treatment (T0V2) which was statistically similar to T0V1 and T0V3 treatment combination.

    3.7. Thousand-grain weight of rice

    The different NGF along with other recommended fertilizers showed an insignificant effect on 1000-grain weight (25.60 g) (Table 4).


    Among the treatments, a maximum 1000-grain weight was found in T1, T3, and T4 treatment. On the other hand, control treatment (T0) produced the lowest (23.90 g) 1000-grain weight. These results indicated that grain size increases insignificantly with the application of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers. A significant variation in 1000-grain weight was also found by Fakhrul et al. (2013) who also conducted their study with the application of inorganic (RDF)+organic (PM) manures where T5 (50% RDCF+4 ton PM ha-1) showed the highest 1000 grain weight. The significant variation in 1000-grain weight might be due to the genetic makeup of particular genotype and sink strength. The results were revealed that the variety BRRI dhan29 (28.6 g) had more efficient to produce larger sizes grain than BRRI dhan28 (23.2 g) and BRRI dhan54 (23.6) (LSD0.05=2.10, Table 2). Ali et al. (2014) found a similar result and they reported that 1000-grain weight differed significantly among the varieties, which was also supported by Shiyam et al. (2014); Islam et al. (2013); and many scientists of the home and abroad were also found significant variation in 1000-grain weight due to the variation in the genetic makeup of the variety. The effect of interaction significant varieties and NGF along with other recommended fertilizers was found in 1000-grain weight (LSD0.05=5.20, Table 6). However, the maximum 1000-grain weight (30.00 g) was found in the treatment combination of T2V1 which was statistically insignificant with the treatment combinations in T2V2, T2V3, T4V1, T4V2, and T4V3.

    3.8.  Grain yield of rice

    A significant variation was found for the character of grain yield of rice due to the effect of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers (LSD0.05=0.91, Table 4). Among the treatments, Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers (T2)produced significantly the highest grain yield (7.81 t ha-1) which was statistically similar to the T4 treatment. The lowest yield of grain (2.53 t ha-1) was found in the treatment T0. This result was revealed that Bio-forge and Root feed along with other recommended fertilizers showed the highest grain yield which might be due to the more effective tillers hill-1, longest panicle, more grains panicle-1 and larger grain. The above findings indicated that the two treatments (T2 and T4) would be ideal for getting a higher grain yield. Similarly, organic+inorganic fertilizer application on boro rice was also conducted by Shaha (2014); Sarkar (2014); Liza et al. (2014); Hasan (2014); Islam et al. (2013) and many other researchers. There was a significant difference between the varieties in grain yield of rice. Among the varieties, BRRI dhan29 (V1) produced the highest grain yield (8.35 t ha-1). The lowest grain yield was found in the varietal treatment V2 (5.82 t ha-1) (LSD0.05=0.64, Table 5).


    The yield was higher in BRRI dhan29 due to the production of the taller plant, more effective tillers, longest panicle, more grains panicle-1 as well as larger sizes grains. Shiyam et al. (2014) reported that the varieties which produced a higher number of effective tillers hill-1 and a higher number of filled grains panicle-1  also showed higher grain yield ha-1. Grain yield was significantly influenced by the interaction effect of varieties and the application of next-generation fertilizer along with other recommended fertilizers (LSD0.05=0.59,Table 6). It was found that the grain yield was significantly varied from 2.75 to 8.61 t ha-1 while the treatment combination T2V1 (BRRI dhan29 receiving of that Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers) showed the highest grain yield (8.61 t ha-1). BRRI dhan58 showed the lowest grain yield (2.75 t ha-1) while it was cultivated without fertilizers under treatment T0.


    3.9.  Straw yield of rice

    The straw yield was significantly influenced by the effect of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers (LSD0.05=0.67, Table 4). Among the treatments, Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers produced significantly the highest yield of straw (7.87 t ha-1) which was statistically similar to treatment T4 (7.30 t ha-1). The lowest yield of straw (6.31 t ha-1) was found in the treatment T0. This result revealed that Bio-forge and Root feed showed a greater effect on straw yield which might be due to the higher plant height, effective tillers hill-1 and longest panicle. There was a significant difference between the varieties in respect of straw yield (LSD0.05=0.67, Table 5). Among the varieties, BRRI dhan29 produced the highest straw yield (8.66 t ha-1) than the other two varieties BRRI dhan28 (7.25 t ha-1) and BRRI dhan54 (7.34 t ha-1). The straw yield was higher in BRRI dhan29 and than that of others, two might be attributed to the production of the taller plant, more effective tillers, and longest panicle.The straw yield was significantly influenced by the interaction effect of varieties and the application of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers (LSD0.05=1.77,Table 6). The treatment T4V1 showed the highest straw yield (9.30 t ha-1) which was very close with the treatment combination T2V2 (9.19 t ha-1). BRRI dhan58 showed the lowest straw yield (5.66 t ha-1) under T0 treatment which was statistically similar to T0V2 treatment combination. This result revealed that the growth of BRRI dhan29 had highly efficient in Root feed along with other recommended fertilizers for getting the tallest plant, maximum effective tillers hill-1 and the longest panicle which resulting in the higher straw yield.

    3.10.  Biological yield of rice

    The biological yield was significantly influenced by the effect of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers (LSD0.05=0.79, Table 4). Among the treatments, Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers produced significantly the highest biological yield (15.68 t ha-1). The lowest biological yield (10.84 t ha-1) was found in the treatment T0. There was a significant difference between the varieties in respect of biological yield (LSD0.05=0.65,Table 5). Between the varieties, BRRI dhan29 produced a higher biological yield (17.01 t ha-1) than the other two varieties BRRI dhan28 and BRRI dhan54 (13.07 and 14.30 t ha-1, respectively. The biological yield was higher in BRRI dhan29 and that of the other two might be attributed to the production of taller plant, more effective tillers, and longest panicle and grain yield.The biological yield was significantly influenced by the interaction effect of varieties and the application of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers(LSD0.05=1.67,Table 6). The treatment T4V1 showed the highest biological yield (17.69 t ha-1). This result revealed that the growth of BRRI dhan29 had highly efficient in Root feed along with other recommended fertilizers for getting the tallest plant, maximum effective tillers hill-1, longest panicle, and grain yield which resulting in the higher biological yield.

    3.11.  Harvest index of rice

    A significant variation was found due to different treatment of NGF along with other recommended fertilizers regarding harvest index (LSD0.05=3.60, Table 4). The highest harvest index (49.81%) was recorded in T2 treatment having Bio-forge along with other recommended fertilizers while it was statistically similar to T3 (46.29%), T4 (48.59%), and T5 (47.88%) treatments. On the other hand, the control treatment T0 showed the lowest harvest index (28.61%). Harvest index (HI) was very significant due to the effect of varieties (LSD0.05=0.41, Table 5). The highest harvest index (49.09%) was found in the varietal treatment V1 and the lowest harvest index (44.53%) was found in V2 treatment which was statistically similar to V3 treatment. Such variation in the genetic makeup of the varieties regarding HI was also found by Yao et al. (2012); Sritharan and Vijayalakshmi (2012); Baset Mia and Shamsuddin (2011) any another many scientist.Harvest index (HI) was very significant due to the effect of treatment combination of varieties and NGF along with other recommended fertilizers (LSD0.05=0.83, Table 6). The highest harvest index (51.95%) was found in the treatment combination of T4V2 which was statistically similar to treatment combinations of T4V3, T1V3, and T2V1. The lowest harvest index (27.69%) was found in the treatment combination of T0V1 which was statistically similar to the treatment combination of T0V2 and T0V3.


  • Conclusion

    The effect of next-generation fertilizers along with other recommended fertilizers on growth, yield attributes, and grain yield of rice was investigated in this experiment. Bio-forge (1.20 l ha-1) + recommended dose N140 P20 K60 S18 Zn2 performed the best compared to other fertilizers treatments of the study in an aspect of growth and yield contributing characters mainly plant height, effective tiller hill-1, panicle length, filled grain panicle-1, 1000 seed weight, harvest index, and grain yield (8.61 t ha-1). Among the varieties, BRRI dhan29 performed the best compare to other treatments of the study in the aspect of yield contributing characters and yield of rice.


  • Acknowledgement

    The authors are very grateful to Sayed Monena Montaj Foundation and National AgriCare Group, Dhaka for their kind and financial support to conduct research work. 


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